Welcome

PASTFORWARD is a scientific research project focusing on herb layers in temperate forests and how their composition changes over time in response to global change. The project specifically investigates whether the history of a forest (e.g. recent forest planted on agricultural land versus ancient forest) determines the way herb layer communities respond to global change. On this webpage you can find more information about the project and its objectives, the methods that are being applied and its scientific output.

Thanks for your interest and enjoy reading!
The PASTFORWARD team

PASTFORWARD ERC UGent ForNaLab

News

New PF paper on agricultural legacies in forest soils

19/10/2018 - Agricultural legacies in forests seem to vary between sites and regions, but can be explained by gradients of inherent soil properties, nitrogen deposition and regional phosphorus nutrient management. Haben Blondeel and colleagues present this conclusion based on a single investigation along these gradients. They analysed soil from 24 paired post-agricultural and ancient forests collected in eight European regions, which they analysed on pH, carbon (C) , nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and base cations. They observed overall higher P-concentrations, higher pH and lower C/N ratio in post-agricultural forests compared to ancient forests. Crucially, they found that the magnitude of these legacies was affected by gradients of soil characteristics, P nutrient management and N deposition.


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New PASTFORWARD publication on N deposition

14/08/2018 - New research led by ForNaLab / PASTFORWARD and contributed to by a team of international scientists, just published in Environmental Pollution, investigates how and why forest understorey responses to nitrogen (N) deposition are context dependent. Mike Perring and co-authors suggest that community responses over time to N deposition are context dependent, especially due to where plots are located along light and fertility gradients, and because of past land management history. The results of this study have important implications for how Europe-wide critical loads are set for forest understorey communities, how conservation and restoration of understorey communities is approached, and for reconciling apparently divergent forest understorey community responses to N deposition


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Latsis symposium on forest restoration

Latsis

06/06/2018 - On6th and 7th June, Mike Perring attended the Latsis Symposium on Scaling up Forest Restoration at ETH Zurich. In his invited talk, he discussed the wider implications of the past for ecological restoration. He illustrated his talk by referring to PASTFORWARD work on forest understoreys, emphasizing that restoring forests is about more than planting trees. The symposium as a whole featured a variety of international speakers with contributions that reflected natural and social science research foci, and perspectives from policy makers and industry. Together, the speakers highlighted the interdisciplinary approach that will need to be adopted to tackle the challenges associated with scaling up restoration. They also emphasized the social and ecological opportunities that arise from successfully meeting these challenges. (picture by Eric Higgs | (c) all rights reserved)


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Another PASTFORWARD publication!

20/03/2018 - In this new publication, Mike Perring and others demonstrate how plant community responses to environmental changes, such as nitrogen deposition and increasing temperatures, depends upon historic land management legacies. Using data from ~2000 plots surveyed at two time points across temperate forests in Europe, they show that trajectories in key understorey community properties are influenced by contemporary change and historical management. We observe increases in species richness/plant height with increasing nitrogen in less-intensively managed high forests from 1800 but declines in former coppice forests. These findings can reconcile contradictory literature on community change, and suggest that anticipating future responses to environmental change requires an appreciation of the legacies of past disturbance.


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New paper on understorey modelling

15/02/2018 - Forest modelling studies often ignore understorey vegetation while predicting the dynamics of temperate forests. Although some models exist that aim to include the understorey as well, attempts are scarce and often consider only one or two variables as drivers of understorey growth. In this paper, published in Perspectives in Plant Ecology, Evolution and Systematics, we provide an overview of existing understorey models, evaluate them in terms of the processes they account for, and suggest a way forward towards a new generation of understorey models that can more accurately predict the composition and functioning of the understorey through time.


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PASTFORWARD teaches high school!

PASTFORWARD in high school

06/02/2018 - Haben, Sybryn and Leen stood in front of the classroom! They taught the 5th year high school students of the VABI in Roeselare about ancient forests, their importance and the reasons why they are under threat. They also provided playful workshops where the students could learn more about different forest types, tree ring measurements, and methods to explore the history of forests in their own neighbourhood. This was an excellent opportunity for the PASTFORWARD-team to communicate about their project to a non-scientific audience, and to increase young students' interest in forest and nature management!


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New PASTFORWARD publication online

31/10/2017 - In this article published in Dendrochronologia, we compared three methods to measure ring-widths on tree cores in terms of a number of quantitative and qualitative criteria. We assessed their differences for a ring-porous (Quercus robur) and a diffuse-porous (Fagus sylvatica) tree species, and evaluated whether growth release detection, an analysis which can be used to reconstruct forest disturbances, leaded to similar results when different ring-width measurement methods were used. Growth releases were consistent among methods despite small, but significant differences in ring-width values. This study stresses the importance of taking into account a study's ultimate objective (e.g. growth release detection versus accurate ring-width measurements) when selecting among alternative ring-width measurement methods.


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Forest dynamics under climate change

PROFOUND 2017

09/10/2017 - This week, Dries attended the final meeting of PROFOUND in Potsdam, Germany. PROFOUND is a COST action with the aim to stimulate international collaboration on modelling forest dynamics under climate change. A broad range of forest dynamic models, soil models, inter-model comparisons, calibration tools and databases were presented. The attendants’ recommendations for further research included, among others, the use of more complex soil models and the use of tree ring data for model calibration and validation. Also investing in model documentation to increase transparency in terms of the processes accounted for, was stressed several times. The importance of the understorey, however, was rarely mentioned. Only in Boreal forest modelling studies, understoreys are being taken into account as an essential component of the forest’s carbon cycle. Hence, convincing forest dynamic modellers that understoreys can play a significant role in determining forest dynamics and functioning will be an important future challenge.


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On the quantification of land use legacies

12/9/2017 - From 12 to 14 September, the 3rd Restoring Forest Conference: Regeneration and Ecosystem Function for The Future (IUFRO) took place in Lund, Sweden. During the first session ‘Learning from the past’, Leen presented her work on quantifying the effects of land-use history on ecosystem dynamics, describing a framework, based on Markov-chain modelling, to account for the effects of past land use on current ecosystem properties and processes. By applying the framework on a case study, Leen found that past fluctuations in light levels in forests, caused by past management interventions, may still have an impact on the present-day forest herb layer community composition.


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Global change and tree growth

6/9/2017 - From 6 to 10 september, the EuroDendro conference took place in Tartu, Estonia. This international conference, being a meeting point for the (European) tree-ring scientific community, addressed diverse topics related to dendroclimatology, dendroecology and dendroarchaeology. Sybryn presented her study on the interactive effects of global change on individual tree growth, based on tree-ring data gathered across Europe (see also the project's work package II). She found that global change promotes tree growth across Europe. However, antagonistic effects among global change drivers were identified as well: increased precipitation might temper the positive effects of nitrogen deposition on tree growth, findings that will be further analysed in the coming months.

EuroDendro 2017

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N-tracing results presented at BIOGEOMON 2017

BioGeoMon 2017

20/8/2017 - To learn more about nutrient uptake and competitive interactions on recent versus ancient forest soils, Elyn and Haben conducted an N-tracing experiment in the PASTFORWARD mesocosms. Preliminary results show that ancient forest species take up less nitrogen and that nitrogen uptake increases when light availability and temperature increases. Interestingly, also past land use seems to have an effect on nutrient uptake. This week, Elyn presented these preliminary results at the BIOGEOMON conference, which took place in Litomyšl, Czech Republic.


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Tree regeneration experiment

Regeneration experiment

1/7/2017 - During spring, Emiel has installed a new experiment using the PASTFORWARD mesocosms as model communities. For this new experiment, three different tree species were sown and planted in each mesocosm to see how their establishment and growth is affected by herb layer composition under the different experimental treatments. In addition, eight new plots were set up to study the growth of these tree species in the absence of a competing understorey community. The experiment will allow us to analyse how understorey composition, global change and past land use affects tree regeneration.


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PASTFORWARD seminars in Ghent

PASTFORWARD seminars

25/1/2017 - On Wednesday the 25th of January, the PASTFORWARD team organised a public seminar in Ghent. Werner Härdtle (University of Luneburg, DE), Wim van der Putten (NIOO, NL) and Jens-Chrsitian Svenning (Aarhus University, DK), professors in basic and applied ecology, presented their work on the impact of global change on ecosystem functioning.


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Mid-term review

23/1/2017 - From Monday the 23th until Wednesday the 25th of January, we organised a three-day mid-term review event to evaluate the work that has been conducted during the project’s first two years and to brainstorm about opportunities and ideas for the future. We invited three international researchers at our lab building in Gontrode, resulting in interesting discussions on experimental setups, preliminary findings, future plans and ways to disseminate scientific results. Many thanks to Werner Härdlte (University of Luneburg, DE), Wim van der Putten (NIOO, NL) and Jens-Christian Svenning (Aarhus University, DK) for their valuable input.

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Internship student joins the team

17/1/2017 - Gabriele Midolo (a Masters student from Wageningen University, NL) has joined the lab as an intern, until mid-May. He will predominantly work in Work Package I, analysing herb layer community dynamics, as estimated by functional group as well as individual species, using the land management database created as part of Work Package I and estimates of global environmental change, together with forest resurvey records from forestREplot. While at the lab, he will also gain experience with other aspects of the PASTFORWARD project e.g. Work Package III, and participate in other projects at ForNaLab.

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New PASTFORWARD publication online

21/12/2016 - In this article, published in BioScience, we advocate combining resurvey data from multiple regions, spanning large environmental gradients, as a promising tool to answer a broad range of ecological questions (similar to the approach applied in work package II). The article provides general guidelines to aid the implementation of multiregion resurvey databases. With this article, we aim to encourage resurvey database development across other community types and biomes to advance global environmental change research.

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A dark day in the forest

experiment

3/10/2016 - Almost noon on a dark day in the forest… Luckily, these communities can benefit from the extra light!


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Experiment up and running

1/4/2016 - Thanks to many helping hands of our lab and a splendid coordination by Haben, the PASTFORWARD mesocosm experiment has been set up! This experiment will allow us to investigate the impact of past land use and global change on understorey community composition. Thanks to a well thought out design, also two-way and three-way interactions among global change drivers can be investigated. For those interested in numbers: 7680 individual plants, planted in 384 trays, filled with 48 different types of soil, collected in 8 regions across Europe, currently being exposed to 8 different global change treatments...

experiment

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Successful second field campaign

forest understorey

26/6/2016 - The large field campaign of Sybryn and Leen has been completed! The team visited another 63 forest plots, again stretching from Western Europe (Wales) to Eastern Europe (Bialowieza in Poland). It was again an adventurous trip with some nice encounters (bison, pine marten, red-breasted flycatcher, moose), and some beautiful and unique forest plots (of which some were situated on a desert island in a lake in Latvia).

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PASTFORWARD researchers in the news

8/6/2016 - The PastForward team is now doing an intensive series of fieldwork throughout Europe and they were spotted by the local press in Germany! The team is investigating the interactive effects of land-use change, atmospheric deposition and climate warming on forest herb layer communities. Read the article published in one of the German papers here!

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Internship student joins the team

01/05/2016 - Abbe Hamilton, a master student at Penn State University (USA), joins the team for three months. Abbe will support the upcoming fieldwork in Wales, the Netherlands, Germany, Latvia and Poland.

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New PASTFORWARD publication online

9/2/2016 - In this PASTFORWARD paper, published in Global Change Biology, Mike details why we expect land use legacies to interact with contemporary environmental changes in determining changes in ecosystem properties. By reviewing the current literature on this matter, he shows that the effect of land use legacies has been frequently overlooked. The paper additionally suggests ways to address this gap in future research, including experimental studies and modelling.

Perring et al., 2016 - GCB

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